the north pole

our band is scientist rock

Inertia

Newton’s first law of motion is often stated as:

An object at rest tends to stay at rest and an object in motion tends to stay in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.

Let’s look at some examples:

  • Blood rushes from your head to your feet while quickly stopping when riding on a descending elevator.
  • The head of a hammer can be tightened onto the wooden handle by banging the bottom of the handle against a hard surface.
  • A brick is painlessly broken over the hand of a physics teacher by slamming it with a hammer. (CAUTION: do not attempt this at home!)
  • To dislodge ketchup from the bottom of a ketchup bottle, it is often turned upside down and thrusted downward at high speeds and then abruptly halted.
  • Headrests are placed in cars to prevent whiplash injuries during rear-end collisions.
  • While riding a bicycle, you fly forward over the handlebars when hitting a curb or rock or other object which abruptly halts the motion of the bicycle.

Extra Credits:

NASA – The Law of Inertia

Top Students:

The Ballyhoo Channel

Glenbrook Highschool

 

 

Advertisements

Filed under: Education, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Idea

With the advent of the Internet and the continuing avalanche of new information, it should become increasingly clear to us that we cannot realistically be expected to teach the details of what is now known about science. Perhaps the details and facts, so often the focus of our instruction in science, should only be stressed to the degree that help us to illuminate and better understand the key “big ideas” of science. Our efforts as science teachers could then focus on providing students with strategies for thinking through ideas, encouragement in transferring their knowledge from one situation to another, and practice in applying scientific approaches to solve real-world problems. In doing so, we can prepare our students to understand key unifying concepts and develop the new “big ideas” for the future of science.

Filed under: Education

Science is tight

Filed under: Education

Atlantis on it’s way

Filed under: Education

Journals

Exposition Vol. 1 - [download]
1. Impacts
2. Juno
3. appendix (i)
4. Marie
5. Newton
6. appendix (ii)
7. Oscillator

Recorded by us in late 2008 and housed in a hand-screenprinted cardboard sleeve. Limited to only 100 copies.

Available from At Home

Expeditions

Currently awaiting supplies...